Page 24 - Forest Row Local January Edition
P. 24

24 January 2022 • Forest Row Local
Each month Kirsten will be sharing information about seasonal medicinal plants. This month it’s all about...
GARLIC
Allium sativum
ail, allium, bulbus allii sativi camphor of the poor, cultivated garlic, nectar of the gods, poor man’s treacle.
Amaryllidaceae commonly known as the amaryllis family
Young garlic plants can be eaten like spring onions. Fresh bulbs should be firm and closely packed, with creamy white or purple papery skin. Harvest in summer when the first leaves start to wilt. Dry in the sun. Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight.
Garlic has a high vitamin C and B6 content, and also contains vitamin B1, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, manganese, selenium, antioxidant sulphur compounds, flavonoids, and volatile oil with high levels of allicin.
 Latin name
Synonyms
Family
Medicinal/ edible parts
Active Constituents
contains vitamin B1, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, manganese, selenium, antioxidant sulphur compounds, flavonoids, and volatile oil with high levels of allicin.
MEDICINAL USE
Garlic is active against bacteria, viruses, fungi
and other infectious microorganisms including staphylococci, streptococci, E-coli, trichomonas, candida and amoebic dysentery. It is commonly used to help relieve colds, flu, bronchitis, and
other viral infections. A growing body of scientific research confirms garlic’s reputation for benefitting the cardiovascular system by lowering cholesterol, reducing blood clots (by preventing platelet aggregation), reducing atherosclerosis, and lowering blood pressure. It has also recently been shown to help lower blood glucose and thus the reduce risk of diabetes.
Warnings: Use with caution if you suffer from gastro- intestinal ulceration, or you are taking anticoagulant medication. Avoid rubbing your eyes if you have garlic on your fingers.
DOSE:
Prophylaxis: one clove a day
Acute infection: one clove 3 times per day
TIPS
• To remove the skin, press down on it with the flat side of a big-bladed knife. Remove the skin, press again, sprinkle with a little salt, and chop.
• Eating fresh parsley with garlic helps avoid, or
at least reduce, garlic breath – garlic pesto (garlic, parsley, nuts, olive oil blended) works well with a piece of bread.
By Kirsten Hartvig ND, MNIMH, DipPhyt Registered naturopath
and medical herbalist. The Healing Garden, Emerson College
                            This strong smelling, pungent tasting bulb of the Amaryllidaceae (amaryllis) family is closely related to the onion and has a history as a food and medicine going back over 7000 years. Even today garlic products are top-selling supplements in pharmacies and health food shops, and fresh garlic is available in any shop or market stall that sells vegetables. China is the biggest commercial grower by far, producing more than 75% of the 17 million tons of garlic grown commercially in the world each year.
Garlic is a bulbous, perennial, flowering plant of the Allium genus, closely related to wild garlic, onion, leek, chives and Welsh onion. It is native to Central Asia and northeastern Iran. The English name “garlic” comes from old English “gar” meaning “spear” and “leek” = spearshaped leek
The plant grows to 60cm high and produces beautiful pink/purple flowers if left in the ground.
Garlic has a high vitamin C and B6 content, and also
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